So I did some more research on exactly what can be called Rum.  I've incuded excerpts from the Food and Drug Regulations as well as the Canadian Food Inspetion Agency.  It's very interesting.  I have studied a lot of languages over the years but Legalese was not one of them.  While I get the gist, still have questions. 

It appears that there are some standard ingredients (see excerpts below) which do not have to be declared since they are considered a standard component of rum.  However, it doesn't say anything about artificial flavours so maybe these have to be included on the label.  But I am still fuzzy on "flavouring and flavouring preparations" as well as the fact that flavourings have to be aged for a minimum of one year in small wood.  I will provide new information when I have it.

This is the excerpt from Canada's Food and Drug Regulations.

[S]. Rum

  • (a) shall be a potable alcoholic distillate, or a mixture of potable alcoholic distillates, obtained from sugar-cane or sugar-cane products fermented by the action of yeast or a mixture of yeast and other micro-organisms; and

  • (b) may contain

    • (i) caramel,

    • (ii) fruit and other botanical substances, and

    • (iii) flavouring and flavouring preparations.

  • (1) No person shall sell for consumption in Canada any rum that has not been aged for a period of at least one year in small wood.

  • (2) Nothing in subsection (1) applies in respect of flavouring contained in rum, but no person shall sell for consumption in Canada rum containing any flavouring, other than wine, that has not been aged for a period of at least one year in small wood.

[Repealed, SOR/93-145, s. 14]

No person shall blend or modify in any manner any rum that is imported in bulk for the purpose of bottling and sale in Canada as imported rum except by

  • (a) blending with other imported rum,

  • (b) adding distilled or otherwise purified water to adjust the rum to the strength stated on the label applied to the container; or

  • (c) the addition of caramel.

  • (1) Notwithstanding section B.02.033, no person shall blend or modify in any manner any rum made from sugar cane products of a Commonwealth Caribbean country that has been distilled and fermented in a Commonwealth Caribbean country and imported in bulk from a Commonwealth Caribbean Country for bottling and sale in Canada as Caribbean rum except by

    • (a) blending with other rum of a Commonwealth Caribbean country;

    • (b) blending with Canadian rum in proportions that result in one to 1.5 per cent Canadian rum by volume in the final product;

    • (c) adding distilled or otherwise purified water to adjust the rum to the strength stated on the label applied to the container; or

    • (d) adding caramel.

  • (2) In this section, “Commonwealth Caribbean country” means Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, the Bahamas, Belize, Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, the Caymen Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Christopher and Nevis, Saint Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago and the Turks and Caicos Islands.

I also took this excerpt about labelling from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

10.8 List of Ingredients

10.8.1 Manner of Declaring
Standardized alcoholic beverages (those with compositional standards in Division 2 of the FDR, such as beer, wine, and rum) are exempt from the requirement to show a list of ingredients on the label [B.01.008(2)(f)]. Unstandardized alcoholic beverages (those for which there is no standard in Division 2 of the FDR) require a complete list of ingredients and their components [B.01.008(1)(b)]. These ingredients must appear in descending order of proportion or as a percentage, both based on the weight of the ingredients prior to these being combined to make the product [B.01.008(3) and (5)]. Therefore, products such as sake, cocktails (manhattans, martinis), pernod, aquavit, etc., require a list of ingredients.